Episode 14

Episode 14 originally appeared September 10, 2018.

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Tracklisting:

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01) "Banyana (Children of Africa)" by Abdullah Ibrahim.

From the 1976 album The Banyana: Children of Africa.

Cape Town, South Africa.

Born as Adolph Johannes Brand and formerly known as "Dollar Brand," Abdullah Ibrahim is a South African pianist and composer. Ibrahim specializes in piano jazz and incorporates African rhythms, gospel, raga and more into his eclectic blend. Ibrahim has also particularly known for  "Mannenberg," which has become an unofficial anthem within the anti-apartheid movement. 

  • Visit Abdulla Ibrahim's official website.

  • Follow Ibrahim on Facebook.

  • Purchase Ibrahim's music on Amazon.

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02) "Breakfast with the Sirens of Infinity" by Naan Violence.

From the 2013 self-titled album.

Memphis, USA.

We first heard Naan Violence when this track was posted by our friends over at Aquarium Drunkard. The group's label, ZAP Cassettes describes them as: "a freak-in transcendental free-sitar underground super-group from Memphis, Tennessee, the home of Isaac Hayes. Lilypadinman.com says: "Fronted by sitar player Arjun Kulharya, Naan Violence creates dreamy, mirage-like sitar music that evokes the mystery of an endless expanse of desert sand. It’s traditional sitar music re-invented for a barroom audience." Aquarium Drunkard describes the music as: "Layered with analog synthesizers, acoustic guitars, flute and tabla, Naan Violence’s expansive palette of sound feels at once organic and untethered." However you'd like to describe the music, we dig it and we think you might too.

  • Purchase the album from ZAP Cassettes.

  • Download this track from Aquarium Drunkard.

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03) "Mascaram Setaba" by Mulatu Astatke.

From the 1972 album Mulatu of Ethiopia.

Jimma, Ethiopia.


From Jimma, Ethiopia, Mulatu Astatke is a pioneer of "Ethio-jazz." His Bandcamp page says: "Mulatu Astatke developed his sound through studies in the UK during the ‘50s and a series of seminal recordings for domestic label Amha before travelling to New York to record the ‘Mulatu Of Ethiopia’ album." Playing vibraphone and conga drums, Astatke has, perhaps, more than any other figure, helped to popularize Ethiopian music for the rest of the world and we are thankful for him.

  • Follow Mulatu Astatke on Facebook.

  • Purchase Astatke's music on Bandcamp.

  • Purchase Mulatu Astatke's music on Amazon.

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04) "Chapei" by Len Buŏn.

From the 2015 single Chapey Dong Veng ||| Len Buŏn & Ham Kin Han.

Phnom Penh, Cambodia.


We've been pleased to feature tracks from the Les Cartes Postales Sonores project before. We heard BUNONG ▲ POP SONGS on Episode 04 and Khmer Traditional Music ||| Mohori Ensemble - Modern wedding songs on Episode 05. Les Cartes Postales Sonores, or The Sound Postcards is a valuable resource for discovering music from around the world. From the Bandcamp page: "The Sound Postcards is a field recording project by Julien Hairon capturing the soundscapes, music and traditions of local and indigenous populations around the world." The recordings are made available for free, not only on Bandcamp but at the Free Music Archive

The Bandcamp page for this release says: "The Chapey Dong Veng is a two-stringed, long neck guitar originaly from Cambodia. Chapei has became popular since the last decade with the living master Kong Nay also known as the "Ray Charles of Cambodia". Met at the Performing arts department of Phnom penh with his elder chapei master Len Buŏn during a musical competition of the oldest art forms, Ham Kin Han plays a song named Kun Apuk Madai and Len Buŏn plays a song called Chapei."

  • Download this release at Bandcamp.

  • Visit Les Cartes Postales Sonores on Facebook.

  • Follow Les Cartes Postales Sonores on Vimeo.

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05) "Dance Twist" by The Cambodian Space Project.

From the 2014 album Whisky Cambodia.

Prey Veng Province, Cambodia.


Nick Cave says: "They're a great band, the singer is amazing, really beautiful, the guitars really jump out at you, very affecting, great stuff." If you need more than a glowing recommendation from none other than Nick Cave himself, the band's website says: "The Cambodian Space Project (CSP) is recognised as one of the few truly Aussie Asian hybrids in contemporary music." The site goes on to say: "Since 2009, it has been at the forefront of an astonishing cultural revival in Cambodia, since singer Channthy Kak & musician Julien Poulson teamed up in Phnom Penh, to sing back to life the lost divas & rock legends of Cambodia’s golden age of music, all but wiped out by the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime." 

The band was even the subject of feature length film Not Easy Rock’n’Roll, which premiered at Sydney Film Festival 2015. However, the band's rise was cut short by the tragic death of singer Channthy Kak in March, 2018, when "the auto rickshaw she was traveling in was hit by a car. The driver who caused the collision was charged with negligent driving causing unintentional injury and death."

  • Visit the band's official website.

  • Like the group on Facebook.

  • Follow the band on Twitter.

  • Purchase the group's music on Bandcamp.

  • Purchase the band's music on Amazon.

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06) "O Navio E Você" by Quarteto Sambacana.

From the 1965 album Muito Pra Frente.

Brazil.


This Brazilian Latin Jazz classic was reissued in 2002. Other than that, we don't see a lot of information about this group anywhere online which means we're probably just looking in the wrong places. Anyone have any further info on this group or recording? 

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07) "Minha Menina" by Onda Vaga.

From the 2018 album Nuestras Canciones.

Cabo Polonio, Uraguay.


Argentine group (formed in Uruguay) Onda Vega plays a mix of styles including Rumba, Cumbia, Reggae and folk. The group's Facebook page says: "A vague wave travels South America. A movement without form, a proper one of cheerful tango." We're not sure what that means, but we like the music. Consequence of Sound describes the band's 2014 Lollapalooza Argentina set as evoking: "the memory of first discovering the bohemian rock of Manu Chao, with both groups sharing a complex sound culled through an array of horns, drums, and guitars."

  • Visit the group's official website.

  • Like Onda Vaga on Facebook.

  • Follow the group on Youtube.

  • Purchase the group's music on Bandcamp.

  • Purchase the group's music on Amazon.


Browse the map (you can switch between episodes using the little window toggle in the upper left corner. This week’s artists are purple pointy map-points.

Episode 05

Episode 05 was originally posted on July 9, 2018.

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Tracklisting:

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01) "Modern Wedding Song 1" by Les Cartes Postales Sonores // Mohori Ensemble.

From the 2015 album Khmer Traditional Music ||| Mohori Ensemble - Modern wedding songs.

Les Cartes Postales Sonores, or The Sound Postcards is a valuable resource for discovering music from around the world. From the Bandcamp page: "The Sound Postcards is a field recording project by Julien Hairon capturing the soundscapes, music and traditions of local and indigenous populations around the world." The recordings are made available for free, not only on Bandcamp but at the Free Music Archive. If you are unfamiliar, the Free Music Archive is exactly what it sounds like: free music galore! What a great way to explore music with little more at stake other than your time. 

This short compilations features traditional wedding songs from Angkor, Cambodia played on the "Khim (struck string instrument) and the Ehru (bow instrument)."

  • Visit the official website

  • Visit Les Cartes Postales Sonores at Free Music Archive

  • Download the compilations at Bandcamp

  • Like Les Cartes Postales Sonores at Facebook

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02) "The Ghost You Love Most" by Qais Essar

From the 2018 album The Ghost You Love Most.

Essar's website describes him as "a contemporary Afghan composer, instrumentalist and producer who channels his melodic designs through the rabab, a 2,500 year old instrument from Afghanistan." We first heard about Qais Essar from this episode of PRI's The World on our local NPR station. Essar is an Afghan-American musician, based in Phoenix, Arizona who plays the rabab. His song "The Crown Sleeps" is featured in the fantastic 2017 film The Breadwinner

  • Visit Qais Essar's official website

  • Like Qais Essar on Facebook

  • Follow Qais Essar on Twitter

  • Hear the episode of The World that introduced us to Essar's music

  • Purchase the album at Amazon

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03) "Inanay" by Tiddas

From the 2015 album The Rough Guide To Australian Aboriginal Music.

When exploring world music, it's always valuable to find compilation series you trust. The Rough Guide series is generally fantastic. They try to combine old and new material, presenting a good overview of each installment. This particular installment focuses on Australian Aboriginal Music. 

Tiddas was an "Australian folk/acoustic trio whose three founding members were, Sally Dastey, Lou Bennett and Amy Saunders. They performed throughout Australia and Internationally from 1990 to 2000." The name "came from the Aboriginal word tiddas (meaning "sisters")." The three got their start together as the backing band for Aboriginal band Djaambi before branching out on their own. 

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04) "Gobbledigook" by Sigur Rós

From the 2008 album Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust.

Icelandic Post-Rock group was founded in Reykjavik, in 1994. The band's Facebook page says: "The band is known for its ethereal sound and lead singer Jónsi’s falsetto voice. Sigur Rós means Victory Rose, named after Jonsi's little sister." Allmusic says this 2008 album: found "the group adding fairly straightforward pop songs to its sound alongside the traditionally epic soundscapes."

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05) "Not Quite Sure" by Ahmet Meter

From the 1993 album Türk Müziğinde Kanun ile Sevilen Şarkılar - Enstrümantal

When rabidly exploring music from around the world, it shouldn't be a surprise when a track seems to be incorrectly named. Our track is labeled as: "Ada Sahillerinde" but that doesn't seem to be a track on this album. So either we got the track name or album name wrong. Or both. Do you recognize this track?  What we do know is that Ahmet Meter is from Turkey and is really good at the Qanun. Meter plays with the National Turkish Orchestra but we couldn't find much more information.

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06) "Ounjaa Kieh Kieh" by Googoosh (Faegheh Atashin / فائقه آتشین‎)

From the 2005 compilation Golden Songs, Vol. 1

For those unfamiliar with the story of Googoosh, the LA Times sets the stage

Few performers have had to endure the kind of disruption that befell the Iranian singer Googoosh when, at the peak of her fame, the 1979 Islamic revolution upended her career.

Overnight, the magnetic singer and performer known and adored by millions could no longer express herself through music in her home country — nor could she leave. Like all female performers after the Islamic Republic of Iran was established, Googoosh was banned from singing in public.

Pitchfork gives some background on Googoosh's groundbreaking career

She was the first woman to star as a protagonist in an Iranian film, 1972’s Bita. She was also the first woman in Iran to incorporate modern dance movements into her performances, which often featured her clad in Western-style ensembles and a trendsetting mod bob haircut.

An important performer with a wide catalog. 

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07) "Inedir" by Asmara All Stars

From the 2010 album Eritrea's Got Soul

In 2010, upon the album's release, The Quietus noted: "Little music has been heard from Eritrea, a small country on the north east coast of Africa, by Western ears in recent years. Eritreans have had other things to deal with than releasing their music out into the wilder world, like years of war with neighbouring Ethiopia and a struggle for independence."

PopMatters gives further insight into the country's rough go: "The development of a tourism industry is hampered by certain obstacles: poverty, lack of infrastructure, and fields of unexploded land mines. Cows walk across the land mines and are never seen again." But despite difficulty, as Culture Trip notes, Asmara All Stars continue to present "a positive message which also engages with their country’s rich cultural heritage."

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08) "Sahara" by Songhoy Blues

From the 2017 album Résistance

The band's Wikipedia page says: "Songhoy Blues is a desert blues music group from Timbuktu, Mali. The band was formed in Bamako after they were forced to leave their homes during the civil conflict and the imposition of Sharia law." The group is one of the principal subjects of the documentary film They Will Have To Kill Us First: Malian Music in ExileThe Guardian says that the band as wowed"international audiences with their mix of desert blues, funk, rock and, well, whatever takes their fancy." This particular track features Iggy Pop ranting about pizza or something. 

  • Visit the group's official website

  • Like Songhoy Blues on Facebook

  • Follow the band on Twitter

  • Follow the group on Instagram

  • Purchase the album at Amazon

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09) "Dansez An Bel Merengue" by Les Léopards de St. Pierre

From the 1970 album Meilleur Ensemble Martiniquais 1970

We couldn't find out much about this one other than Les Léopards de St. Pierre is a Calypso band from Martinique. Do you know more about this one? 

  • Watch some live videos at Youtube

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10) "Futuro Mutante" by Bacalao Men

From the 2018 album Sangre.

Formed in 1999 in Caracas, Venezuela. The band's website describes their essence as: "intelligent lyrics, afrolatin beats with jolts of funk, hip hop and electronic."

  • Visit the group's official website

  • Find the band on Facebook

  • Follow the group on Instagram

  • Purchase the album at Amazon


Browse the Global Elite Music Map to see where in the world we've visited so far. Episode 05 is represented by the purple-ish points. To see individual episodes, toggle all back and forth-ish using the little window/arrow thing in the upper-left corner.

Episode 04

Episode 04 was originally posted on July 2, 2018 

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Tracklisting:

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01) "▲  11" by Les Cartes Postales Sonores.

From the 2018 album BUNONG POP SONGS.

Les Cartes Postales Sonores, or The Sound Postcards is a valuable resource for discovering music from around the world. From the Bandcamp page: "The Sound Postcards is a field recording project by Julien Hairon capturing the soundscapes, music and traditions of local and indigenous populations around the world." The recordings are made available for free, not only on Bandcamp but at the Free Music Archive. If you are unfamiliar, the Free Music Archive is exactly what it sounds like: free music galore! What a great way to explore music with little more at stake other than your time. 

The Les Cartes Postales Sonores Free Music Archive Page describes this compilation as being recorded "among the Bunong people, an ethnic group living in the mountains of Cambodia. It is also a tribute to the artist Lok Ta. They offer us a fabulous musical cocktail pop synth and psyche influenced by the traditional music of this people so little known in Cambodia because the dominant culture of this country is the Khmer culture."

We will definitely be hearing more from this series.

  • Visit the official website

  • Visit Les Cartes Postales Sonores at Free Music Archive

  • Download the compilations at Bandcamp

  • Like Les Cartes Postales Sonores at Facebook

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02) "Bahar Türküsü (Spring Song)" by Yurdal Tokcan.

From the 2004 album Bende Can (Inner Soul).

Tokcan was born in Ordu in 1966. He graduated from the Turkish Music State Conservatory of Istanbul Technical University in 1988 and was appointed as oud player to the Istanbul State Turkish Music Ensemble, which belongs to the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism in 1990. The Turkish Cultural Foundation says that Tokcan's style: "combines older traditions with many new stylistic innovations, which are also present in his playing of the fretless guitar. His many new compositions combine traditional rich melodies with polyphonic textures performed on Turkish classical instruments."Makam New York says

Yurdal Tokcan is being regarded as one of the finest oud players in the world today. His style combines older traditions with many new stylistic innovations, which are also present in his playing of the fretless guitar. His new compositions combine traditional rich melodies with polyphonic textures performed on Turkish classical instruments.

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03) "Kule Kule" by Konono Nº1.

From the 2005 album Congotronics.

Konono Nº1 is a musical group from KinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo. The group's Facebook page says they were "founded over 25 years ago by Mingiedi, a virtuoso of the likembé (a traditional instrument sometimes called "sanza" or "thumb piano", consisting of metal rods attached to a resonator)."

The group often refashions junkyard items into instruments (we here at the Global Elite Music Radio Podcast Supershow are always looking for signs of redemption) and uses rudimentary amplification "including a microphone carved out of wood fitted with a magnet from an automobile alternator and a gigantic horn-shaped amplifier. "

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04) "Moonlight" by The Pigram Brothers.

From the 2008 album The Rough Guide To Australian Aboriginal Music.

When exploring world music, it's always valuable to find compilation series you trust. The Rough Guide series is generally fantastic. They try to combine old and new material, presenting a good overview of each installment. This particular installment focuses on Australian Aboriginal Music. 

The Pigram Brothers are a seven-piece Indigenous Australian band from Broome, in Western Australia. 

  • Find The Pigram Brothers on Facebook

  • Purchase the compilation on Amazon

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05) "Varied Trio - II. Bowl Bells" by Lou Harrison.

From the 1988 album La Koro Sutro.

NPR describes Harrison as an"American maverick," who "blended Eastern and Western traditions in his music, practicing a kind of "cross-culturalism" long before it was fashionable." Harrison was an American composer  who was a student of Henry CowellArnold Schoenberg, and K. P. H. Notoprojo. He often incorporated non-Western tones and instruments and here focuses on Gamelan, a Javanese ensemble focusing on percussive instruments including musical bowls. 

Harrison was born in Portland, OR but became enamored with Eastern culture from an early age and often sought to bridge culture gaps, telling NPR in 1999: "We're all human beings," he said. "We have the same ears and we have the same feelings. There's no 'they' there anymore. We're all 'we.'" That's a sentiment we can get behind. 

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06) "Seoul" by Amiina.

From the 2007 album Kurr.

The list of backing bands that make it on their isn't all that grand. The J.B.'s of course. Amiina started as the string section for Icelandic atmospheric explorers Sigur Rós. The group's website describes the bands beginnings as being a "string quartet formed by four girls (Edda Rún Ólafsdóttir, Hildur Ársælsdóttir, María Huld Markan Sigfúsdóttir and Sólrún Sumarliðadóttir) at the Reykjavík College of Music in the late 1990s." The group plays a variety of instruments including musical saws, kalimbas, even music boxes. Fans of Sigur Rós will find much to like here.  

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07) "Ana Osiidwa (The Orphans)" by Alan Namoko and Chimvu Jazz.

From the 1992 album Ana Osiidwa (The Orphans).

Alan Namoko was a blind blues and jazz musician from Malawi. Namoko played the banjo and sang in the Lomwe, Chewa and Nyanja languages. Namoko became an influential figure in Malawi's music scene in the 1970s and 1980s and around the world with the Chimvu Jazz band and was even featured on several episodes of the John Peel show.

  • No purchase or artist links available

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08) "She May, She Might" by Yo La Tengo.

From the 2018 album There's a Riot Going On.

Yo La Tengo are an American Indie rock band formed in Hoboken, NJ in 1984.The band specializes in a heavy wash of atmospheric guitars. Pitchfork describes them as "a band that, almost in spite of its members’ encyclopedic knowledge of 20th-century music and penchant for irony, operates most effectively at the level of feel," saying that the band captures "the feeling of post-traumatic calm on their latest album, assuring their status as a wry and comforting cornerstone of indie rock."

  • Visit the group's official website

  • Follow the group on Facebook

  • Follow the group on Twitter

  • Follow the group on Instagram

  • Watch a 2018 live set for Pitchfork

  • Purchase the album at Amazon


See the updated artist map. To switch between seasons, use the little window box at the top left. This week's artists are the dark grey points.