Habañero Collective: Glory Days, A House Show Mix

Sometimes you don’t realize what you’ve created until you can separate yourself a bit. Get a different perspective. See it as a whole.

I have been privileged to be part of Habañero Collective for some time now. We used to do a music/interview podcast. Then we started hosting house shows in the Phoenix area.

For various and sundry life reasons and circumstances, we’ve taken an extended break from hosting house shows. This time away gave me just enough separation to start looking back at some of the amazing artists we’ve hosted. We’ve been blessed to rub shoulders with some truly creative and dynamic people. People who believe in their craft and pursue creativity.

Until we start hosting shows regularly again, here is a mix of 22 of the amazing artists we’ve been privileged to host in one venue or another. And, even more amazing, this is not all of the artists we’ve worked with.

Enjoy:



If you’re interested, here is the setlist:

  1. Distress by Jeremy Casella
  2. America’s Son by Air Review
  3. When It Don’t Come Easy by Justin McRoberts
  4. One, Two, Three by Christian Lee Hutson
  5. Big Ghost by Chris Bathgate
  6. Folded Hands by Zoo Animal
  7. Always The Same by the Autumn Film
  8. Arrowplane by Trevor Davis
  9. Ornithology  by Foreknown
  10. New Way of Living by David Ramirez
  11. Letting Go And Holding On by Shawn Skinner and the Men of Reason
  12. Minnie Pearl by Matt Haeck
  13. Monster Truck by Ramsay Midwood
  14. The Truth by American Longspurs
  15. We Will All Be Changed by Seryn
  16. Old Man’s Town by the Hollands!
  17. Bones by Owl Parliament
  18. Honest Kind of Luck Dylan Pratt
  19. Sisters and Brothers by the Vespers
  20. Switzerland by the Last Bison
  21. Nothing Like A Train by Bill Mallonee and the Vigilantes of Love
  22. Homestead by Northern Hustle

The Long Strange Trip Continues (We’re Planting Another Church!)

church_planting-400x300In 2008, my family and I moved from TX where I was pastoring back to AZ to plant Church of the Cross (which has since become Missio Dei Peoria).

In January 2015, a year after adopting four kids at once (putting us at 8 kids), I resigned from ministry in general and specifically from the church we planted in 2008.

2015 has been a whirlwind with a consistent theme from Psalm 46:

Be still and know that He is God.

When I resigned, it was important for Kristi and I that “vocational ministry” not be a career option for an unspecified period of time. With over ten years of lead pastor experience, I probably could have been hired at an existing church. But that just wasn’t right. Throughout 2015, I applied to more than 153 jobs (I stopped counting at 153). Most of those were jobs for which I was well qualified (at least on paper). But nothing. Nada. Zip. Zilch. Bupkiss. A big goose-egg.

That’s not to say that I haven’t worked hard during this time, just that God has not provided full-time employment. Kristi and I both have worked part time for our friends Mark and Jill at Twigs and Twine. This has been a great experience. We’ve learned a lot but we’ve always known that this was not a long-term solution to our situation. It has felt like God was arranging our circumstances so that we would rest in Him even without knowing what was next. To be still. And know that He is God. And we are not.

This is a difficult lesson. It is often uncomfortable but it gets to the very heart of faith itself. Following Jesus means submitting our wills to His and trusting. God has been teaching me this tough lesson over the past year or so.

As I stated, it was important for us to have an unspecified period of time during which full-time ministry (at least in the pastoral sense) was not an option. Not only did we want to see what else God might have for us, we knew that one of two things would happen:

  1. The “indefinitely” would simply progress and we would not ever return to vocational ministry and we would be OK with that, or
  2. God would change our hearts and the “call” to ministry on our lives would return.

As 2015 wore on, the latter happened.

Before I explain what this means, I want to pause for a couple of side-notes.

First, my wife Kristi and I have been remarkably on the same page for every major decision throughout our relationship. This has helped serve as a natural form of discernment for both of us. Believe me, Kristi is not afraid to tell me when she thinks I’m wrong. It is important to me that my wife is on the same page. And she is.

Second, the idea of a “call to ministry” is fuzzy and nebulous at best. But I can say is that our decision to once again consider full-time ministry was not motivated by the fact that I had trouble finding employment. I hope that this goes without saying but I wanted to say it regardless. I have a healthy respect for ministry which requires that it be more than just a job.

In late 2015, not only did I start to miss vocational ministry but Kristi confirmed that I was once again being called to return and that we as a family wanted to give our lives in this way. As we wondered what this might mean for our family, we began talking with my friend Steve about planting a church together in Gilbert.

Steve planted a church called Ekklesia in 2009. Through mutual involvement with the local Surge Network, Acts 29 and Soma Communities, Steve and I became good friends. Around the same time I resigned, Steve shut down his church plant. However, because he’s so awesome, Steve has maintained great relationships with the people of that church, retaining a core group ready to plant another church.

After nearly eight months of prayer and consideration, Steve and I believe that the time is right to move forward with planting a church made up of Gospel Communities on Mission. We are humbled to announce that we are in the initial stages of planting Mosaic Church.

The Thomas Ten is in the process of moving to the Gilbert area so that we can devote ourselves to this exciting new gospel work. Since our ministry conviction is based on relationships and everyday life, it is important for us to be where we minister. We are currently raising the necessary funds to launch this new church and we appreciate anything you can give towards this goal.

Once we can get to that side of town, we will move forward with forming Gospel Communities and launching a Sunday gathering. Our goal is to move as soon as possible so that the kids can transition schools smoothly.

There’s still a lot to figure out and I’m sure you have questions. Feel free to ask them. And please pray for us. Please pray for wisdom, for discernment, for joy, for clarity and conviction. Please pray that God would provide the necessary resources and prepare hearts.

  • Visit the Mosaic Church website.
  • Visit the Mosaic Church Facebook page.

Refugees, Terror Threats and Seeking the Path of Peace

800px-Entering_Arizona_on_I-10_WestboundIn response to the horrible terrorist attacks in Paris this past weekend, Arizona Governor Doug Ducey recently joined the chorus of elected officials trying to block the incoming flow of refugees.

As a citizen of Arizona, Ducey does not speak for me on this issue. In fact, his actions have prompted some thoughts.

I am not an elected official, much less governor. But I am a Daddy to eight children and I know what it means to want to protect them. But I have come to learn that what I think is best in protecting them may not always be what’s best to help them grow in to being responsible, loving adults.

I understand Governor Ducey’s reaction. But that’s exactly what it is, a reaction. It is reactionary. Reactions can be thoughtful But most of the time they are not, they are rushed and rarely get to the heart of the issue at hand. And the more I think about Governor Ducey’s statement, I can’t help but filter it through my own faith and how that faith would prompt me to react.

My faith prompts me to bless others because of the blessings I have received.

My faith pushes me to consider others as more important than myself. Yes, I might get hurt. Yes, it will most likely cost me but my faith enters into serving others with full awareness that I might get hurt and that it will cost. That’s what love is.

My faith dictates that I am not the arbiter of who deserves help and who does not. My faith pushes me to help, to seek the better, not primarily for myself but for others, even my enemies.

My faith demands that I seek the welfare of the disenfranchised, care for widows and orphans, clothe the naked, feed the poor and shelter refugees and seek the path of peace.

My faith says to meet hate with love, to somehow diffuse violence with love.

My faith casts out fear rather than being ruled by it.

My faith strives for peace and orbits around reconciliation.

My faith does not make sense and sometimes feels next to impossible to live out in real life, especially when wondering how a government ought to respond to terrorism.

You may not share my faith but surely you can agree that violence only begets violence. Hatred and fear boil over, dissolving reason. Retaliation knows no end. Rejecting others because we “might get hurt” only leads to separation and separation never sprouts unity. Disunity fosters ignorance. Fear plus ignorance equals . . . Nothing good.

While I understand that my faith does not dictate government policy, I at least want to live somewhere that is known for valuing people, rather than rejecting them. I don’t know how to do this other than to urge my elected officials to rise above fear mongering and do my best to love others. That seems like as good a place to start as any.

Just In Time For Christmas!

Holiday At The Sea Fine Arts

Self-promotion is always a difficult thing. But if you’re going to pursue what you love, I suppose it comes with the territory, right? I mean, after all, if you believe in you’re doing, you’ll want to promote it, right? You’ll want others to share in the delight a pursuit brings you.

Or something like that.

I don’t know.

I started creating art pieces as a form of self-therapy/relaxation. Because I’m an American Narcissist I posted them online and I received some positive feedback. This positive feedback stimulated the pleasure zones in my brain and made me want to put more art into the public sphere so that I could feel better about myself. Then people started asking where I was selling my pieces and I began to feel really good about myself, so who am I to argue with the masses? I’m just here to give the people what they want. I’m here to serve. You called down the art, now get out your checkbook.

OK, not really.

But seriously, you can buy my original pieces at my new Etsy shop and you can order prints (framed or un) and shower curtains and duvet covers and such sundry items at my Society6 page.

Yes, all of your holiday wishes can come true.