The Great American Mixtape Exchange: 2015 Favorites (Chris Martin Edition)

2993_tape1 copyAnd now, it our friend Chris Martin’s turn!

Here’s what he has to say about his mix:

“Here are some of my favorite songs from 2015. There’s no real theme here, aside from the fact that I’ve danced to most of these songs with my one year old son over the past year.

I tried to at least put the songs in an order that isn’t too jarring. The exception is the two songs at the end: The Valley Maker track is by a friend of mine and it was just too good to leave off even though it’s totally different than everything else on the list. The other exception is the Vince Staples song. It has some serious profanity in it, so I put it at the end so people can skip it if they want.

Finally, there’s some great music videos on this list. I especially love the Thundercat and Courtney Barnett videos.

Enjoy!”

Chris chose to make a Youtube playlist of his picks. Here is the traklisting:

  • Kamikaze by MØ
  • Gold by Kiiara
  • Fela by nvdes
  • Standard by Empress Of
  • Blue & Green by Loyal
  • Them Changes by Thundercat
  • Hotline Bling by Donna Missal
  • Home by Islandis
  • Heroes by Callers
  • Desire by Dilly Dally
  • Dead Fox by Courtney Barnett
  • Book of Right On by Foxtails Brigade
  • Pretty Little Life Form by Valley Maker
  • Norf Norf by Vince Staples
Stream the mix right here:

Or find it on Youtube here.

the Weekly Town Crier

London's Town Crier copyI know what you’re thinking: Gosh-dangit, this guy is at it again?! Does he really think we care this much about what he found so interesting this week?! Yes, yes I do think you’re interested in what I found interesting this week. That’s why you’re hear, isn’t it? Admit it, you’re interested. And that’s interesting, isn’t it?

Welcome to the Weekly Town Crier: where I collect links to various things I found interesting this week. You read what interests you and skip what doesn’t and we’ll all be happily interesting together. Separate. On our computers.

Buy my art here or here or contact me directly to purchase originals.

Visit our family blog: “The Thomas Ten.”

Browse Large Hearted Boy‘s list of “100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads.”

It’s the most wonderful time of year: year-end list time!

  • * = Added to the list this week.
  • Listen as All Songs Considered considers the year in music.
  • Browse American Songwriter’s picks for the “Top 50 Albums of 2015.”
  • Browse Aquarium Drunkard‘s unranked picks for music of the year. *
  • Browse AV Club‘s picks for “The 15 best albums of 2015.”
  • Browse AV Club‘s picks for their favorite books of the year. *
  • Browse AV Club‘s picks for: “graphic novels, one-shots, and archives of 2015.” *
  • Browse as Christianity Today hands out their annual books awards. *
  • Browse Consequence of Sound‘s picks for the “Top 50 Songs of 2015.”
  • Browse Consequence of Sound‘s picks for the “Top 50 Albums of the Year.”
  • Browse The Daily Beast‘s picks for “The Most Overlooked Movies of the Year.” *
  • Browse The Daily Beast‘s picks for music of the year. *
  • Browse David Dye’s (World Café) dspicks for albums of the year. *
  • Browse Design Week’s picks for their favorite album covers.
  • Browse Drowned In Sound‘s favorite albums of 2015. *
  • Browse FACT‘s picks for the best record labels of the year.
  • Browse FACT‘s picks for albums of the year.
  • Browse as First Things considers their year in books. *
  • Browse Flavorwire‘s picks for “The 50 Best Independent Press Books of 2015.”
  • Browse Flavorwire‘s picks for the best nonfiction books of the year. *
  • Browse as Bill Gates picks his favorite books read in 2015. *
  • Browse The Gospel Coalition editors’ picks for books of the year. *
  • Browse iBooks‘s favorite books of 2015. *
  • Browse iTunes‘ favorite music of 2015. *
  • Browse iTunes‘s favorite movies of 2015. *
  • Browse as the KEXP DJ’s make their picks.
  • Browse The New York Times‘s picks for their favorite albums of 2015. *
  • Browse NME‘s albums of the year.
  • Browse as No Depression considers “Great albums at the bottom of the list.” *
  • Browse Noisey‘s picks for songs of the year.
  • Browse Noisey‘s picks for albums of the year.
  • Browse NPR Music’s “50 Favorite Albums Of 2015.”
  • Browse NPR’s picks for the best books of 2015
  • Browse OkayPlayer‘s favorite albums of the year. *
  • Browse as Pandora reveals the top 100 “thumbed up” songs of 2015.
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for the “The 50 Best Songs of 2015.”
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for albums of the year.
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for “The 10 Best Box Sets of 2015.”
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for “The Best Comic Books of 2015.”
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for “The 20 Best New Bands of 2015.” *
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for the best canned beers of 2015. *
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for the best fiction books of the year. *
  • Browse (part one/part two) Phoenix New Times‘s picks for best AZ songs this year. *
  • Browse Piccadilly Records‘s choices.
  • Browse Pitchfork‘s top 50 albums of the year. *
  • Browse as Pop Matters‘s makes their picks for “The 80 Best Albums of 2015.”
  • Browse The Quietus‘s picks.
  • Browse “Relevants” top 10 albums of 2015.
  • Browse Rolling Stone‘s picks.
  • Browse Rough Trade‘s picks for their favorite albums of the year.
  • Browse Spin‘s picks for “The 50 Best Albums of 2015.”
  • Browse Spin‘s picks for the “101 Best Songs of 2015.”
  • Browse Stereogum‘s picks for their favorite new bands of 2015.
  • Browse Stereogum‘s picks for albums of the year.
  • Browse Stereogum‘s picks for their “80 Favorite Songs Of 2015.”
  • Browse Time‘s picks for the top 10 movies of the year. *
  • Browse Time‘s top 100 photographs of the year. *
  • Browse Tiny Mix Tape‘s 50 favorite albums of 2015. *
  • Browse Uncut‘s favorite albums of 2015.
  • Browse Under the Radar‘s 2015 picks. *
  • Browse Vogue‘s picks for albums of the year.
  • Browse the favorite music from Zia Records‘ staff. *

See Banksy remind the world that Steve Jobs was the son of a Syrian immigrant.

Read Vanity Fair‘s piece: “Frank Sinatra’s Drummer Tells the Story of His Final Concert.”

Browse as Marie Claire recommends: “6 Graphic Novels By Women You Need To Read.”

Browse as the Rumpus recommends books about Bob Dylan.

Browse Baeble‘s list of “The 10 Most Ridiculous Moments In Music In 2015.”

Browse Paste‘s picks for “18 Documentaries about Writers.”

Browse Paste‘s “Complete Guide to Music Snobbery in Noah Baumbach Movies.”

Watch the Oh Hello’s perform a Tiny Desk Concert.

Download a vintage holiday mixtape from Aquarium Drunkard.

Read Consequence of Sound‘s report: “Pandora executive says Steve Jobs “eviscerated the music industry”.

  • Read the New York Times‘ report that “Apple Gains Exclusive Streaming Deal With Taylor Swift.”

Read as The Atlantic considers “Why L.L. Bean’s Boots Keep Selling Out.”

Read CNN‘s report that scientists claim that the Mona Lisa is actually hiding another painting.

Browse “Relevant”‘s picks for “The Best Christmas Movies on Netflix.”

Watch/read CNN‘s report: “5 things you didn’t know about satanists”.

Read as The Atlantic considers “Why Americans All Believe They Are ‘Middle Class'”.

Watch as The Atlantic ponders near death experiences.

Read Slate‘s piece about Walmart entering the pay-account business: “After Refusing to Take Apple Pay, Walmart Launches Walmart Pay.”

Read/listen as NPR’s Here and Now considers Kentucky’s “First Woman Master Distiller In Modern Times”.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is Giving You Over 400,000 High-Res Digital Images For Free“.

Read about the North Carolina town who “rejects solar because it’ll suck up sunlight and kill the plants”.

Browse NME‘s list of “100 Lost Albums You Need To Know.”

Read as The Daily Beast wonders “Is This Stone the Clue to Why Jesus Was Killed?”

Read Uncut‘s report: “Iggy Pop, Buzzcocks and The Damned to celebrate punk’s 40th anniversary at Isle of Wight Festival.”

Read as The Atlantic considers why “There’s No Such Thing as Free Shipping”.

Read the Guardian‘s piece: “Rachel Dolezal: ‘I wasn’t identifying as black to upset people. I was being me’.

See what “$1,000 Per Month In Rent Will Get You Around The U.S.”

Read/see Salon‘s piece “Scientists claim this is how Jesus Christ really looked”.

Read as Andrew Jones considers the little-known Christian roots of Yoga.

Read Brain Picking‘s piece: “Bob Dylan on Sacrifice, the Unconscious Mind, and How to Cultivate the Perfect Environment for Creative Work.”

  • Read as the Washington Post considers why Bob Dylan lyrics pop up so much in medical literature.

Read Flavorwire‘s profile of Jukely, the subscription service for concerts.

Read The Daily Beast‘s report that MLB will not reinstate Pete Rose.

Hear Neko Case on NPR’s quiz show Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me.

Read National Geographic‘s profile of Joe Pug.

Read a report that Mark Driscoll has filed incorporation papers for a new church in the Phoenix, AZ area.

Read as Christianity Today considers the infiltration of multi-level marketing into American Evangelical churches.

Browse Turntable Kitchen‘s holiday gift guide for music lovers.

Read Harper Lee‘s 1961 piece My Christmas in New York.

Read Stereogum‘s report: “Amazon Developing Scripted Series About The Grateful Dead.

Browse Vice‘s “Definitive Guide to Hipster Music Genres.”

Read Pitchfork‘s piece: “Lowell Brams Discusses Sufjan Stevens‘ Album About His Life.”

Read GQ‘s profile of Hillsong, NYC, church to, among others, Kevin Durant and Justin Bieber.

See a man’s beer can collection, worth over $1 million.

Read about the Wheaton professor suspended after saying that Muslims and Christians worship the same God.

Read as Christianity Today considers the recent surge of hymns in the spotlight.

Read as Merle Haggard discusses his recent health scare.

Try Charles Mingus‘ potent egg nog recipe at your own risk.

Read Flavorwire‘s piece: “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Seals Its Irrelevance With Another Year of Sad Boomer Inductees.”

The Great American Mixtape Exchange: 2015 Favorites (Danny Lopez Edition)

2993_tape1 copy

Hey I made a mix! And It’s really good!

 

 

 

Here’s a track listing:

1 – Kurt Vile – Pretty Pimpin
2 – Tame Impala – Yes I’m Changing
3 – Son Lux – You Don’t Know Me
4 – Von the Baptist – Graves
5 – Sufjan Stevens – Fourth of July
6 – Alabama Shakes – Gimme All Your Love
7 – Dustin Kensrue – Gallows
8 – Kendrick Lamar – How Much A Dollar Costs
9 – MUTEMATH – Stratosphere
10 – MewithoutYou – Red Cow
11 – My Morning Jacket – In Its Infancy (The Waterfall)
12 – Josh Garrels – A Long Way
13 – Foals – Lonely Hunter
14 – Andra Day – Rearview
15 – Noah Gundersen – Selfish Art

I didn’t follow any sort of theme, but I did try to pick songs that fit well together. For this reason, I left all of the metal and hip-hop albums that I was stoked on this year, but I assure you there were some good ones there too. The only hip hop song I left in there is one by Kendrick Lamar because his album this year was just too powerful and too significant to leave out of a 2015 mix. I put it right smack in the middle, which will either make it feel awkward or give you a good bookmark right in the middle. Either way, listen to the lyrics, they’re powerful and very relevant considering our current selfishness in trying to hoard everything while the rest of the world starves.

“Have you ever opened up Exodus 14? A humble man is all that we ever need. Tell me how much a dollar cost.”

What If Preaching Isn’t The Primary Role Of A Pastor?

Preaching_TheoMatters3Yesterday I wondered about why it seems that so much of “American Christianity” resembles the self-help driven “pursuit of happiness” more than it does following Jesus through the Valleys as well as they plateaus.

Long-time reader, first-time commenter Jennifer noted:

It seems what you’re asking for is a Christianity in which people inside the body of Christ are authentic with one another.

“That’s exactly what I’m asking for”, I responded, continuing:

I’ve come to believe that most (well-intentioned) church programs exist because real relationships don’t. The main thing we’ve been called to is discipleship which happens best in relationships, not church classrooms. Since programs/classes are not real life, they’re not designed or equipped to deal with people’s real lives so we default by pretending everything is fine.

Many of our churches foster fake environments in which people pretend everything is fine “because JESUS” because they’re simply not designed to deal with real life. You come, sit in a sit, get told how to win at life, sing some rousing songs, maybe go to a class to learn some information and then go about your week until it’s time to charge your emotional batteries once again.

Many churches seek to fill our calendars “equipping us” with classes and programs because that’s what churches do. But what we’ve missed is that if we fostered intentional, “authentic” (the quotes indicate that I realize just how much baggage the word carries but I use it anyways) relationships. It seems to me that the trend has been to make Christians dependent on their churches for their spiritual growth. The default question has become “how will you feed me?” rather than “how can I serve?”

But we’ve been called to discipleship, not what fills the seats. Paul tells us that the role of church leaders is to equip everyday believers “for the work of the ministry” (Ephesians 4:11-13), not make them dependent on their leaders.

This has led me to think deeply about one of Evangelicalism’s (especially in “Reformed” circles in which I have traveled) sacred cows. Lately, my Facebook and Twitter feeds have been filled with posts arguing that preaching is the primary things a pastor should be concerned with. For example, Jason Allen writes in a piece about “5 words to avoid in every sermon” at For The Church:

Preaching is God’s ordained method to convey his Word and build his church. As such, preaching is every pastor’s principle responsibility and every church’s primary need. Therefore, every pastor must preach, and preach well, every Lord’s day.

Banner of Truth recently posted this memed Calvin quote:

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Let me go ahead and calm the frothing masses: I deeply value preaching. I think it should be an integral part of the regular rhythms of any local church. It is where a unified vision can be presented, it is where a church family can learn together as a whole, it is where the elders can help publicly protect from error and instruct in following Jesus. It is an essential part of what God has laid out for the local church. But what troubles me is the notion that it is the most important thing a pastor does.

I once heard John MacArthur say to a room full of seasoned, young and aspiring pastors that if they weren’t spending at least 40 hours a week in their study, then they had no business getting up in the pulpit on a Sunday morning. Their primary job, MacArthur urged, was preaching on Sunday.

There is a local church with one of those electronic billboards that flashes cheesy Christian sayings. A while back, the sign said: “Worth the drive.” What’s worth the drive? Well, knowing that particular church, the Sunday gathering is “worth the drive” and in particular, it’s “worth the drive” to hear that particular pastor talk for 40 minutes.

It seems to me that the assumption that the pastor’s primary responsibility is preaching must also carry with it the assumptions that Sunday is the primary point of a local church’s existence and that since discipleship is the primary point of a church’s existence, then preaching is the primary way we pursue discipleship. But I cannot follow such straight lines of thinking through the twists and turns of Scripture.

Pastors are compared to shepherds in the bible. As I try to make sense of all of this, I can’t help but picture a shepherd gathering his sheep once a week and lecturing them on how to live the rest of the week and then just sending them out to face the dangers of the world. Of course this is foolish, but when we over-emphasize the importance of the Sunday sermon, the analogy seems to fit. Shepherds were worthless if they didn’t spend time with their sheep, guiding, protecting, disciplining if necessary (it may shock you to know that the heartwarming picture of a shepherd carrying a sheep on his shoulders was because he had broken the sheep’s leg because it wandered off so many times).

I am unashamedly going off of the notion that the church should be most concerned with discipleship; that is, helping one another become more like Jesus. This conviction leads me to the conclusion that preaching is incredibly important but it is potentially harmful to tell pastors that it is the “most important” part of their job.

I would rather be shepherded by someone who spends more time with people than books. I want to be the type of pastor who values people more than doctrine. If I ever pastor again, I want to know what my people need to hear because I know my people. And, as shocking as it may seem, you can’t know people without spending time with them. With all due respect to MacArthur, his advice is terrific for professional teachers but horrible for actual pastors.

Placing so much emphasis on the sermon creates passive Christians who tend towards a knowledge-based (rather than an experiential) faith. Placing so much emphasis on the sermon is a large part of why so many pastors feel so discouraged. Once, after a sermon, I had someone come up to me afterward and, very nicely, tell me that they really struggled to follow that week’s sermon. The very next person in line to talk with me told me that it was the single most moving sermon they had ever heard and they would remember it for a long time. Placing so much emphasis on the sermon creates unrealistic expectations that the pastor always “be on” and owes more to our desire to be entertained than our desire to be more like Jesus. Placing so much emphasis on the sermon has helped fuel the “celebrity pastor” movement rather than reminding us all that pastors are strugglers through this life just like they people they’ve been called to shepherd.

If we have primarily been called to discipleship then it seems to me that relationships are the single most important thing a pastor does. Sermons rarely serve to deepen relationships. In fact, sermons are sharpened the more a pastor knows the people to whom he is speaking. Shepherds must spend time with the sheep or they’re a lousy shepherd.

Again, I’m not discounting preaching (though I do question the monologue approach in its effectiveness to really equip the saints but maybe that’s another post for another day). I value preaching and it’s something I personally love. I’m simply asking if we have over-emphasized its role in discipleship. Are we actually hindering pastors from their true role when we tell them that the 45 minutes a week when they lecture people is the most important thing they do?

I look forward to your thoughts.

Inside (Out) the Christian Life, Sadness and Depression

45173My family and I love most of the Pixar movies. We haven’t seen The Good Dinosaur yet, but Inside Out was no exception.

Inside Out tells the story of 11-year old Riley and her family as they move from the midwest to San Francisco. But there’s a catch. Most of the movie takes place inside Riley’s head and the main characters are five emotions: Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger and Disgust.

I don’t want to drop too many spoilers but let’s just say that the plot takes a twist when Joy tries to prevent Sadness from having too much influence over Riley. In fact, much of the conflict revolves around Joy trying to limit Sadness’ influence.

The assumption, of course, is that it is “better” to be happy than sad. So much so that Joy is willing to pursue this agenda even at the cost of betraying Sadness, generally belittling her and suggesting that Sadness has little to offer and generally made things worse. The optimal state, according to Joy and many of us is happiness.

Most of us would probably agree. We would say that we would rather be happy than sad. After all, Americans have dedicated our country to “the pursuit of happiness.” We deserve to be happy, right? Happiness means that things are better.

And it seems that much of this mindset has found its way into “American Christianity” (moralistic therapeutic deism). Whether it’s Joel Osteen telling us that we deserve our “best life now” because we’re children of God or local megachurches promising people they can “win at life,” much of “American Christianity” seems barely one-step removed from simply wanting to make people feel good about themselves.  Our worship gatherings resemble rock concerts and our preachers mimic self-help snakeoil-men.

But, of course, one of the things that makes Inside Out brilliant is that everyone, including Joy, is forced to not only accept Sadness but cherish her. Because, they realize that, without sadness, empathy is next to impossible. Without sadness, happiness is simply a hollow masking over of the circumstances. Without sadness, we’re willing to make harmful choices to keep up the thrill of “happiness”. We may not long for sadness but we cannot truly grow without it.

I wonder, then, why so little of “Christian worship” welcomes sadness into the chorus. After all, isn’t our “worship music” supposed to be an extension and elevation of the everyday? Then why is it all in major keys? Life is not always joyful and triumphant. Sometimes you feel as though you’ve been kicked one too many times and you’re just not sure you’ll get up this time and you just need to sing, “How long do I have to wait patiently for you, God?”  Where are the songs that acknowledge that God’s help may not come until the morning (Psalm 46:5) and the sun feels as though it’s barely set.

We have equated worship with a positive emotional response because we have come to understand that faith in Jesus is ultimately about making us happy. We have signposts everywhere telling us that we’re on the wrong path. But it’s so smooth and everyone else is on it. You really want me to go through that narrow gate that hardly anyone else is going through to that really difficult looking path (Matthew 7:13-14)?

But a faith that serves primarily to make its holder happy is not a faith that will stand the storm (Matthew 7:24-27). We even have “Christian counseling” movements that tell people that their depression/anxiety, etc. is a result of sin. And they’re simply compounding sin if they take medication to deal with their already sinful sin of disbelief that God’s Word is not somehow sufficient to deal with their unrepented sin which caused their depression in the first place.

We have pushed sadness and depression and anxiety and frustration beyond the city gates because they just bring us down, man. But following Jesus is so beautiful because it envelops all of life. Of course there is a place for sadness and of course Jesus can see us through it because He himself wept (John 11:35). Jesus could have simply told his friends that “God works in mysterious ways” and that He was working even this difficult situation for their good and rebuke the sadness. But He didn’t. He wept. Because sadness is real and must be accepted because it gives depth, it makes us richer, it brings us closer, it gives us empathy and shows us the true value of happiness when it comes. It also reminds us that it’s not realistic or healthy to expect to be happy all of the time.

I’m not sure what it looks like but I want a Christianity that’s ministry to me when I’m sad is not just to point out the reasons I should be happy or to rebuke for the reasons I’m not. There may certainly be times when rebuke is necessary but I wonder how much richer our faith would be if we were simply willing to meet with people in their sadness and sit with them? What if more of our songs, sermons and gathered worship helped us understand sadness and depression rather than try to give us tips to avoid them?

Maybe it means writing more worship songs in minor keys? Maybe it means simply reading more of the Psalms together? Maybe it means more preachers admitting that following Jesus is sometimes really difficult and it will not always feel like our “best life now”? Maybe it means recognizing that there are parts of the Bible that we’d rather skip over? Maybe it means that it won’t be until we values the lows as much as the highs that our faith truly means anything in the everyday?

Am I the only one who feels like “American Christianity” deserves the Flanders stereotype? I guess if I am, I’ve got issues other than depression to work through. But if I’m not, I wonder why so many churches seem to take the same approach. I’d love your thoughts.

In the meantime, here’s a unique take on a “Christian classic”:


the Weekly Town Crier

London's Town Crier copyYeah, you know that’s right. This is how we do it. and other stuff all you cool kids say on the beat. Wait for the drop. Get your groove on.

Actually, I doubt anyone actually reads this first part so it doesn’t really matter what nonsense I come with, now does it? Let’s be real. There are lots more important things for us to consider. Like, for instance, some of the links I found interesting this week. I hope you find them interesting as well.

Buy my art here or here or contact me directly to purchase originals.

Visit our family blog: “The Thomas Ten.”

Browse Large Hearted Boy‘s list of “100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads.”

Browse Taste of Cinema‘s picks for “The 15 Most Memorable Songs Used In Wes Anderson Movies.”

  • Read Consequence of Sound‘s report: “Bill Murray signs on for Wes Anderson’s next film.’

It’s the most wonderful time of year: year-end list time!

  • * = Added to the list this week.
  • Listen as All Songs Considered considers the year in music.
  • Browse American Songwriter’s picks for the “Top 50 Albums of 2015.”
  • Browse AV Club‘s picks for “The 15 best albums of 2015.” *
  • Browse Consequence of Sound‘s picks for the “Top 50 Songs of 2015.”
  • Browse Consequence of Sound‘s picks for the “Top 50 Albums of the Year.”
  • Browse Design Week’s picks for their favorite album covers.
  • Browse FACT‘s picks for the best record labels of the year.
  • Browse FACT‘s picks for albums of the year. *
  • Browse Flavorwire‘s picks for “The 50 Best Independent Press Books of 2015.”
  • Browse as the KEXP DJ’s make their picks.
  • Browse NME‘s albums of the year.
  • Browse Noisey‘s picks for songs of the year.
  • Browse Noisey‘s picks for albums of the year. *
  • Browse NPR Music’s “50 Favorite Albums Of 2015.” *
  • Browse NPR’s picks for the best books of 2015 *
  • Browse as Pandora reveals the top 100 “thumbed up” songs of 2015.
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for the “The 50 Best Songs of 2015.”
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for albums of the year.
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for “The 10 Best Box Sets of 2015.” *
  • Browse Paste‘s picks for “The Best Comic Books of 2015.” *
  • Browse Piccadilly Records‘s choices.
  • Browse as Pop Matters‘s makes their picks for “The 80 Best Albums of 2015.” *
  • Browse The Quietus‘s picks.
  • Browse Rolling Stone‘s picks.
  • Browse Rough Trade‘s picks for their favorite albums of the year.
  • Browse Spin‘s picks for “The 50 Best Albums of 2015.”
  • Browse Spin‘s picks for the “101 Best Songs of 2015.”
  • Browse Stereogum‘s picks for their favorite new bands of 2015.
  • Browse Stereogum‘s picks for albums of the year.
  • Browse Stereogum‘s picks for their “80 Favorite Songs Of 2015.” *
  • Browse Uncut‘s favorite albums of 2015.

Read The Atlantic‘s piece: “Quick Thinkers Seem Charismatic, Even If They’re Not That Smart.”

See A Rare Video For Bob Dylan‘s ‘Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues’ at NPR.

R.I.P. Robert Loggia.

R.I.P. North Face founder Douglas Tompkins.

Listen To Wilco’s Episode Of Song Exploder.”

Browse Fast Company‘s list of “7 Common Public Speaking Tips You Should Ignore.”

Read Time‘s report: “Samsung to Pay Apple $548 Million in Patent Case.”

  • Read The Verge’s report: “Apple waited too long to get into music streaming,” ending with the line: “If Apple is serious about winning in music streaming, the bar must be raised. The name on the door isn’t enough anymore.’

See “A Stunning Scale Model of Our Solar System, Drawn in the Desert.”

Read/listen to NPR’s piece: “After Mass Shootings, People Turn To Prayer — And Prayer Shaming.”

Read The New Yorker‘s piece: “How Jane Vonnegut Made Kurt Vonnegut A Writer.”

See “What Happens When Millennials Try To Use Their Grandparents’ Technology.”

If you’re in the Phoenix area and looking for a way to help others this Holiday Season, browse Flourish Phoenix‘ list of “11 Ways to Love Our Neighbors this Christmas.”

Read The Atlantic‘s piece: “Why God Will Not Die: Science keeps revealing how much we don’t, perhaps can’t, know. Yet humans seek closure, which should make religious pluralists of us all.”

Read as First Things considers the disappearance of Advent from the regular practice of many churches.

Read Slate‘s report that “Amazon Just Bought Its Own Fleet of Semi-Trucks.”

Read as The New Yorker considers “How Energy-Drink Companies Prey On Male Insecurities.”

Browse NME‘s list of “61 of the Greatest Film Soundtracks Ever.”

Read as The Daily Beast considers: “A new study finds that people who love bulls**t inspirational quotes have lower intelligence and more “conspiratorial ideations.”

Watch as “Colbert Explains Why ‘Thoughts and Prayers’ Matter”.

Read as Russell Moore reminds us “Why Christians must speak out against Donald Trump’s Muslim remarks.”

Read as Pitchfork considers “How Playlists Are Curating The Future of Music.”

Read BBC News‘ report that Jimmy Carter is now cancer-free.

Read as the Smithsonian considers “How Twitching Frog Legs Helped Inspire Frankenstein“.

Read as Scott Weiland’s ex-wife and children share some sobering thoughts about the man behind the songs.

See “Inside Walt Disney’s Immaculately Reconstructed Office.”

Read as Paste considers “How The Internet Killed Late-Night Comedy.”

Read as “Rush’s Neil Peart says he’s retired from music”. Wait, no. Read this report that says Rush are not breaking up after all.

Read Thom Yorke‘s letter to Father Christmas, asking for reading clashes and letting oil companies have it.

Read as Christianity Today wonders: “Do Babies Go to Heaven?”

Read as Gary Clark Jr. considers five songs he wishes he’d written with Rolling Stone.

Read Rolling Stone‘s report that Taylor Swift, Kendrick Lamar, and the Weeknd Lead this year’s Grammy Nominations.

Download Noisetrade‘s 2015 Holiday Mix.

Read Lifeway’s report: “Successful new churches share four factors” at Christianity Today.

Read Pitchfork‘s report that The Replacements biography has been announced, with participation from band members.

Read The Concourse‘s piece: “Happy 20th Birthday To This American Life, Which Is Way Darker Than You Think.”

Read/Listen to NPR’s report that Germany’s Angela Merkel has been named as Time‘s Person of the Year.

Read NPR’s report that Diane Rehm will retire from her long-running broadcast show after the 2016 presidential election.

Read as The Gospel Coalition considers “How Twitter Helped Fred Phelp’s Granddaughter Walk Away From Westboro.”

Meet Kanye West‘s pastor who has his own reality show, “Rich In Faith.”

Browse Food & Wine‘s list of “50 Amazing Nanobreweries in 50 States.”

Read Boing Boing‘s report that Marriott hotels will be “removing desks from its hotel rooms “because Millennials”.

Read “A Christian Case for Ending the War on Drugs The unintended consequences of America’s drug policies” at “Relevant”.

Read Christianity Today‘s report: “Pastors and Pews Vastly Disagree on Discipleship Success.”

Read OkayPlayer‘s report that Wu-Tang Clan has given themselves and/or Bill Murray permission to legally steal their $2 Million album sold to “Pharma Bro”.

Read Christianity Today‘s report that C.S. Lewis was a secret government agent.

ReadNietzsche on the Power of Music”.

The Great American Mixtape Exchange: 2015 Favorites (Jonathan Wolfinger Edition)

2993_tape1 copy“Since it was confined to 2015 here’s the jist of this list . . . Songs that stir – Either for musical quality/jamability or rich lyrical content.

The order of the list attempts to give a start a little “high” and then track through the valley before the light is seen again.”

Songs That Stir tracklisting:
  1. Then Came The Morning  by The Lone Bellow
  2. Gimme All Your Love by Alabama Shakes
  3. Brother by The Brilliance
  4. Love at the End (live) by John Mark McMillan
  5. Cold As It Is by The Lone Bellow
  6. Don’t Wanna Fight by Alabama Shakes
  7. Take My Love by The Lone Bellow
  8. Everything Is Yours by Liz Vice
  9. Does Your Heart Break by The Brilliance
  10. Still I Will Praise You by Daniel Bashta
  11. May You Find A Light (reprise) by The Brilliance
  12. There’s A Light (live) by Liz Vice
  13. What Beautiful Things by Dustin Kensrue
  14. Carbon Ribs (live) by John Mark McMillan
  • Listen to Jonathan’s mix at Spotify.

Or, there’s really no need to leave when you can listen right here: